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(63) AN ACTOR WEARING A DEMON'S GARMENT

Once upon a time, there was a troupe of actors from Cadhara Kingdom, rambling in different parts of the country giving performances due to a famine. They passed the Pala New Mountain where evil demons and men-eater Raksas had been found. The troupe had to lodge in the mountain where it was windy and cold. They slept with the fire on. One of them who were chilly wore Raksa demon's costume and sat near the fire when another actor awoke and saw him. He ran away without looking closely at him. In general panic, the whole troupe got up and ran away. The one who wore the Raksa garment, not realizing what was happening, followed them.

Seeing he was behind them, all the actors got more frightened to do them harm. They crossed rivers and mountains, and jumped into ditches and gullies. All got wounded in addition to the great fear they suffered. They did not realize that he was not a demon until daybreak.

So are all the common people. Those who happen to be in the midst of the misfortune of famine, do not spare themselves trouble to go far away to seek for the sublime teaching of the Four Transcendental Realities of Nirvana, namely eternity, bliss, personality and purity. However, they cling to their egos which are nothing more than five components of a human being. Because of this, they are flowing back again and again through transmigration. Pursued by temptation, they are out of sorts in falling into the ditch of the Three Evil Paths. Only when the night of transmigration is ended, does the wisdom appear once again. Also only at this moment can one perceive the five components of a human being have no real ego.
63伎兒著戲羅剎服共相驚怖喻

昔乾陀衛國有諸伎兒,因時飢儉,逐食他土,經婆羅新山,而此山中素饒惡鬼食人羅剎。時諸伎兒會宿山中,山中風寒然火而臥,伎兒之中有患寒者,着彼戲本羅剎之服向火而坐。時行伴中從睡寤者,卒見火邊有一羅剎,竟不諦觀捨之而走,遂相驚動一切伴侶悉皆逃奔。時彼伴中着羅剎衣者,亦復尋逐奔馳絕走,諸同行者見其在後,謂欲加害,倍增惶怖,越渡山河投赴溝壑,身體傷破疲極委頓,乃至天明方知非鬼。

一切凡夫亦復如是,處於煩惱飢儉善法,而欲遠求常樂我淨無上法食,便於五陰之中橫計於我。以我見故流馳生死,煩惱所逐不得自在,墜墮三塗惡趣溝壑,至天明者喻生死夜盡智慧明曉,方知五陰無有真我。

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