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(67) A BET OVER A CAKE

Once upon a time, there were a man and his wife who shared three cakes. On the third, they made a bet, "whoever talks first loses his share of the cake." After this, they stopped talking.

In no time, a thief forced his way into the house to rob valuable things. The couple saw that everything fell into the thief's hand without uttering a sound, due to the bet they had made previously. Seeing that they said nothing, the thief started to attack the wife in the presence of her husband who still would not utter a word. Then she shouted to her husband, "How stupid you are! You wouldn't shout only because of a cake."

Clapping his hand in joy, the husband said, "Oh! My girl. I'll get the cake. I won't give you any of it."
Upon hearing the story, everyone nearby laughed at them.

So are the common people.

For a little fame and gain, people deceptively appear to be quiet and silent. When they are disturbed with their false worries and all other evil thoughts, they are not afraid of losing their good teachings and falling into the Three Evil Paths of Transmigration. They do not try to seek to leave this world. When they have their five desires fulfilled, they do not think of the ensuing suffering. Therefore, they are in no way different from that stupid husband.

67夫婦食餅共為要喻

昔有夫婦有三番餅,夫婦共分各食一餅,餘一番在,共作要言:「若有語者要不與餅。」既作要已,為一餅故各不敢語。須臾有賊入家偷盜取其財物,一切所有盡畢賊手;夫婦二人以先要故,眼看不語。賊見不語,即其夫前侵略其婦,其夫眼見亦復不語。婦便喚賊,語其夫言:「云何癡人為一餅故見賊不喚?」其夫拍手笑言:「咄婢我定得餅,不復與爾。」世人聞之無不嗤笑。

凡夫之人亦復如是,為小名利故詐現靜默,為虛假煩惱種種惡賊之所侵略,喪其善法墜墮三塗,都不怖畏求出世道,方於五欲躭著嬉戲,雖遭大苦不以為患,如彼愚人等無有異。

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