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(81) GETTING BITTEN BY A BEAR

Once upon a time, there were a man and his son traveling together. The son got into the woods and was bitten by a bear. Scratches were all over his body. Being in a difficult situation, he fled to his father. Seeing his son's wounds, the father was astonished and asked, "How did you get wounded?"
The son replied, "There was a long-haired monster that bit me."

The father grasped bows and arrows and went to the woods where he saw a longhaired supernatural being. When he was about to shoot at him, a bystander said, "Why do you want to shoot at this, since he is innocent? You should punish the guilty."

This is also held to be true with the stupid of the world.

People offended by an immoral monk in his religious robe, are apt to do the worst harm to all good and virtuous monks. This is just like the father wanting to be revenged on the supernatural man for his son's bites by a bear.

81为熊所啮喻

昔有父子与伴共行。其子入林为熊所啮,爪坏身体,困急出林,还至伴边。父见其子身体伤坏,怪问之言:「汝今何故被此疮害?」子报父言:「有一种物,身毛耽毵,来毁害我。」父执弓箭,往到林间,见一仙人,毛发深长,便欲射之。傍人语言:「何故射之?此人无害,当治有过。」

世间愚人亦复如是,为彼虽着法服无道行者之所骂辱,面滥害良善有德之人,喻如彼父,熊伤其子,而枉加神仙。

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