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Ingratitude Punished

K‘U TAYU was a native of the Yang district, and managed to get a military appointment under the command of Tsu Shushun. The latter treated him most kindly, and finally sent him as Major General of some troops by which he was then trying to establish the dynasty of the usurping Chows. K‘u soon perceived that the game was lost, and immediately turned his forces upon Tsu Shushun, whom he succeeded in capturing, after Tsu had been wounded in the hand, and whom he at once forwarded as a prisoner to headquarters. That night he dreamed that the Judge of Purgatory appeared to him, and, reproaching him with his base ingratitude, bade the devil lictors seize him and scald his feet in a cauldron of boiling oil. K‘u then woke up with a start, and found that his feet were very sore and painful; and in a short time they swelled up, and his toes dropped off. Fever set in, and in his agony he shrieked out, “Ungrateful wretch that I was indeed,” and fell back and expired.

厙將軍

厙大有,字君實,漢中洋縣人。以武舉隸祖述舜麾下。祖厚遇之,屢蒙拔擢,遷偽周總戎。後覺大勢既去,潛以兵乘祖。祖格拒傷手,因就縛之,納款於總督蔡。至都,夢至冥司,冥王怒其不義,命鬼以沸油澆其足。既醒,足痛不可忍。後腫潰,指盡墮。又益之瘧。輒呼曰:「我誠負義!」遂死。
  異史氏曰:「事偽朝固不足言忠;然國士庸人,因知為報,賢豪之自命宜爾也。是誠可以惕天下之人臣而懷二心者矣。」

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