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The Faithful Dog.

A CERTAIN man of Lungan, whose father had been cast into prison, and was brought almost to death’s door, scraped together one hundred ounces of silver, and set out for the city to try and arrange for his parent’s release. Jumping on a mule, he saw that a black dog, belonging to the family, was following him. He tried in vain to make the dog remain at home; and when, after travelling for some miles, he got off his mule to rest awhile, he picked up a large stone and threw it at the dog, which then ran off. However, he was no sooner on the road again, than up came the dog, and tried to stop the mule by holding on to its tail. His master beat it off with the whip; whereupon the dog ran barking loudly in front of the mule, and seemed to be using every means in its power to cause his master to stop. The latter thought this a very inauspicious omen, and turning upon the animal in a rage, drove it away out of sight. He now went on to the city; but when, in the dusk of the evening, he arrived there, he found that about half his money was gone. In a terrible state of mind he tossed about all night; then, all of a sudden, it flashed across him that the strange behaviour of the dog might possibly have some meaning; so getting up very early, he left the city as soon as the gates were open, and though, from the number of passers-by, he never expected to find his money again, he went on until he reached the spot where he had got off his mule the day before. There he saw his dog lying dead upon the ground, its hair having apparently been wetted through with perspiration; and, lifting up the body by one of its ears, he found his lost silver. Full of gratitude, he bought a coffin and buried the dead animal; and the people now call the place the Grave of the Faithful Dog.

義犬

潞安某甲,父陷獄將死。搜括囊蓄,得百金,將詣郡關說。跨騾出,則所養黑犬從之。呵逐使退;既走,則又從之,鞭逐不返。從行數十里。某下騎,趨路側私焉。既乃以石投犬,犬始奔去;某既行,則犬歘然復來,囓騾尾足。某怒鞭之。犬鳴吠不已。忽躍在前,憤齕騾首,似欲阻其去路。某以為不祥,益怒,回騎馳逐之。視犬已遠,乃返轡疾馳;抵郡已暮。及捫腰橐,金亡其半。涔涔汗下,魂魄都失。輾轉終夜,頓念犬吠有因。候關出城,細審來途。又自計南北衝衢,行人如蟻,遺金寧有存理?逡巡至下騎所,見犬斃草間,毛汗溼如洗。提耳起視,則封金儼然。感其義,買棺葬之,人以為義犬冢云。

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