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The Marriage Of The Virgin Goddess.

AT Kueichi there is a shrine to the Plum Virgin, who was formerly a young lady named Ma, and lived at Tungwan. Her betrothed husband dying before the wedding, she swore she would never marry, and at thirty years of age she died. Her kinsfolk built a shrine to her memory, and gave her the title of the Plum Virgin. Some years afterwards, a Mr. Chin, on his way to the examination, happened to pass by the shrine; and entering in, he walked up and down thinking very much of the young lady in whose honour it had been erected. That night he dreamt that a servant came to summon him into the presence of the Goddess; and that, in obedience to her command, he went and found her waiting for him just outside the shrine. “I am deeply grateful to you, Sir,” said the Goddess, on his approach, “for giving me so large a share of your thoughts; and I intend to repay you by becoming your humble handmaid.” Mr. Chin bowed an assent; and then the Goddess escorted him back, saying, “When your place is ready, I will come and fetch you.” On waking in the morning, Mr. Chin was not over pleased with his dream; however that very night every one of the villagers dreamt that the Goddess appeared and said she was going to marry Mr. Chin, bidding them at once prepare an image of him. This the village elders, out of respect for their Goddess, positively refused to do; until at length they all began to fall ill, and then they made a clay image of Mr. Chin, and placed it on the left of the Goddess. Mr. Chin now told his wife that the Plum Virgin had come for him; and, putting on his official cap and robes, he straightway died. Thereupon his wife was very angry; and, going to the shrine, she first abused the Goddess, and then, getting on the altar, slapped her face well. The Goddess is now called Chin’s virgin wife.

金姑夫

會稽有梅姑祠。神故馬姓,族居東莞,未嫁而夫早死,遂矢志不醮,三旬而卒。族人祠之,謂之梅姑。丙申,上虞金生,赴試經此,入廟徘徊,頗涉冥想。至夜,夢青衣來,傳梅姑命招之。從去。入祠,梅姑立候簷下,笑曰:「蒙君寵顧,實切依戀。不嫌陋拙,願以身為姬侍。」金唯唯。梅姑送之曰:「君且去。設座成,當相迓耳。」醒而惡之。是夜,居人夢梅姑曰:「上虞金生,今為吾婿,宜塑其像。」詰旦,村人語夢悉同。族長恐玷其貞,以故不從。未幾,一家俱病。大懼,為肖像於左。既成,金生告妻子曰:「梅姑迎我矣。」衣冠而死。妻痛恨,詣祠指女像穢罵;又升座批頰數四,乃去。今馬氏呼為金姑夫。
  異史氏曰:「不嫁而守,不可謂不貞矣。為鬼數百年,而始易其操,抑何其無恥也?大抵貞魂烈魄,未必即依於土偶;其廟貌有靈,驚世而駭俗者,皆鬼狐憑之耳。」

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