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The Shewolf And The Herdboys.

TWO herd boys went up among the hills and found a wolf’s lair with two little wolves in it. Seizing each of them one, they forthwith climbed two trees which stood there, at a distance of forty or fifty paces apart. Before long the old wolf came back, and, finding her cubs gone, was in a great state of distress. Just then, one of the herd boys pinched his cub and made it squeak; whereupon the mother ran angrily towards the tree whence the sound proceeded, and tried to climb up it. At this juncture, the boy in the other tree pinched the other cub, and thereby diverted the wolf’s attention in that direction. But no sooner had she reached the foot of the second tree, than the boy who had first pinched his cub did so again, and away ran the old wolf back to the tree in which her other young one was. Thus they went on time after time, until the mother was dead tired, and lay down exhausted on the ground. Then, when after some time she shewed no signs of moving, the herd boys crept stealthily down, and found that the wolf was already stiff and cold. And truly, it is better to meet a blustering foe with his hand upon his sword hilt, by retiring within doors, and leaving him to fret his violence away unopposed; for such is but the behaviour of brute beasts, of which men thus take advantage.

牧豎

兩牧豎入山至狼穴,穴有小狼二,謀分捉之。各登一樹,相去數十步。少頃,大狼至,入穴失子,意甚倉皇。豎於樹上扭小狼蹄耳故令嗥;大狼聞聲仰視,怒奔樹下,號且爬抓。其一豎又在彼樹致小狼鳴急;狼輟聲四顧,始望見之,乃舍此趨彼,跑號如前狀。前樹又鳴,又轉奔之。口無停聲,足無停趾,數十往復,奔漸遲,聲漸弱;既而奄奄僵臥,久之不動。豎下視之,氣已絕矣。今有豪強子,怒目按劍,若將搏噬;為所怒者,乃闔扇去。豪力盡聲嘶,更無敵者,豈不暢然自雄?不知此禽獸之威,人故弄之以為戲耳。

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